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Worldwide shipping ✨ Ethically crafted by artisans
Worldwide shipping ✨ Ethically crafted by artisans
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Bali Jewelry

Discover our Bali jewelry curated selection, handmade in Sterling Silver and 18K Gold with Topaz, Turquoise, Tanzanite, and Labradorite and many more gemstones. Ethically crafted by Balinese artisans using traditional techniques. Find your new favorite rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings or make a unique gift to that special someone. Every purchase supports an artisan in Indonesia.


FAQs about Bali Jewelry

What is Bali style jewelry?

Bali jewelry can be modern, antique or tribal. The best pieces are normally associated with the Majapahit Dynasty in Java and Bali as well as the awesomely superb filigree and granulation work of southern Sulawesi, specifically Makassar. Indonesia is not a large supplier of precious stones, so many designs are purely metal. One exception would be Kalimantan which is known for their specific but not high grade diamonds. The Balinese have a special appreciation for nature, the abundant flowering trees on their island, so you’ll find traditional jewelry very ornamental. Popular imagery is flowers, sea creatures like turtles and sea stars, mandalas and Hindu gods and goddesses.

What jewelry is Bali known for?

The Balinese people are master craftspeople: wood carving is a significant part of their culture, and this comes through in some of the detailed jewelry designs. Traditionally, Balinese goldsmiths like to work with metal such as 18-22K gold and 925 sterling silver, because it is softer and more malleable for carving and chasing techniques.

What is the history of Bali’s crafting tradition?

Bali’s unique crafting tradition starts in the 14th century with the colonization by the Majapahit Empire of Java. In that period, the island gathered the world’s best silversmiths and goldsmiths who made local craft flourish, inspiring generations to come until this day.

How do you take care of Balinese jewelry?

Store in a clean, dry place. Generally, jewelry should only be put on after washing or applying any makeup, hair spray, gels, lotions or perfume. Keep away from extreme temperatures and over-exposure to direct sunlight. It is not recommended to wear your jewelry while swimming, showering, or washing hands. If you would like your Balinese jewelry to last longer avoid contact with hand sanitizer, hand soap, alcohol and any other harmful chemicals, and do not soak in water. Tips for cleaning and storing your Bali jewelry: Be mindful and try not to use too much force on thin wires. Avoid rubbing the polish cloth on gemstones or shells. The polish cloth is treated with a chemical cleaner that can be harmful to stones.

Is Bali jewelry for men or women?

Our collection of handcrafted Balinese jewelry is for both men and women.

What Balinese jewelry can I buy?

Our Bali jewelry collection features rings, bracelets, earrings and necklaces.

What are the materials used in Bali jewelry?

Bali jewelry is famous for mastering the use of silver. A group of smiths from Singaraja, in the North part of the Island, trace their line back before the immigration of the Majapahit Javanese. Another clan of smiths consider themselves direct descendants of Brahma, the fiery Hindu God. The symbolic importance of precious metals in Hindu cosmology is reflected in the belief that the triple peaks of Mt. Meru, the abode of the Gods and the center of the world, are made of gold, silver and iron.

What is special about Bali jewelry?

Balinese silverwork is part of an ancient tradition.The art of metal work arrived in Indonesia in the Bronze Age from Southern Chinese and Southeast Asian areas. Bronze drums, dated from as early as the fifth century BC, have been found throughout the archipelago, and some of them are believed to have been cast in Bali. The accumulation of wealth which ensued encouraged the refinement of many art forms, including jewelry. By AD 1,000 gold and silverwork in Java had reached a level of artistry as high as that of the bronze caster. The abundance of gold was documented by a Chinese trader who reported in 1225 that Javanese criminals, except for thieves and murderers, were not imprisoned or subjected to corporal punishment but fined in gold.